Monday, February 2, 2009

Canadian Pharmacy and Glavmed: An Open Letter To Law Enforcement, The FTC And The FDA

To whom it may concern (and ultimately it concerns all of you.)

I write today to petition your attention towards a large-scale international illegal pharmacy operation known as Glavmed.

Glavmed are the sponsor program promoting the very-widely-spammed property known as "Canadian Pharmacy". (Hereinafter referred to as "CPh".) If you have an email address of any sort, it is very likely that you're at least mildly aware of Canadian Pharmacy. It's the most commonly spammed property on the Internet today, and shows no signs of slowing down whatsoever. CPh has been relentlessly spammed to millions of recipients for the past three years. Here is a screenshot of a currently spammed domain, dadsymbol.com:



Please note that depending on your geographic location, this same domain will appear as "Canadian Pharmacy", "European Pharmacy", and a variety of other variations on that brand name. They do this by using geographic sensing of inbound IP addresses to the site. The overall layout and functionality remains the same.

The Websites

On the surface this appears to be a fairly innocuous website selling what appear to be legitimate pharmaceutical products. However a little further examination proves that this is a site selling fake, knock-off, imitation versions of some fairly widely-sold pharmaceutical products such as Viagra and Cialis. The clue that this is not legitimate is that they also sell the following products:


  • Viagra Professional

  • Cialis Professional

  • Viagra Super Active

  • Cialis Super Active

  • Viagra Soft Tabs

  • Cialis Soft Tabs

  • VPXL

  • Levitra Professional

  • Levitra Super Active



None of these products have ever been produced by the actual originators of the original Viagra or Cialis. These products have only been sold from shady, illegitimate online pharmacies.

Add to this that they have creatively spelled the names of one or more dangerously addictive and harmful products such as "Phentrimine", and offer another bogus version of this same product named "Herbal Phentermine", and it becomes clear that this is a company which is distributing products of dubious origin and manufacture.

All of these products are sold without the need for any prescription, whcih violates several FDA regulations, especially for the sale of controlled substances such as phentermine.

Further (although technically speaking this is less of an issue than the risk to public health and safety): these sites' continued use of the brand name "Viagra" is in violation of the trademark and intellectual property rights of Pfizer, who owns the Viagra name and the patent on its particular medicinal formula. There is no such thing as "generic" Viagra, nor has there ever been. It is not legal to make -- or claim to make -- Viagra while Pfizer still holds the patent. The same is true of Cialis and Levitra.

Sales of these alleged "generic" pharmaceuticals violates the law in most countries around the world. Sale of these products in their legitimate form without consultation with a physician or a registered pharmacist is also illegal, and violates several sections of the FDA act.

Finally: sale of controlled substances - phentermine definitely qualifies, but again: who knows what's actually in the pills this "company" is selling to you? - is also against the law when done so without any registered pharmacist or a valid, authorized prescription.

This organization breaks several international laws, but more importantly it poses a very serious threat to the public's health.

Promotion Via Illegal Spam

The only way that perhaps 70% or more of the world has heard of Canadian Pharmacy is via the unrelenting, large-scale receipt of illegally-sent spam email messages. By "illegally-sent", I refer specifically to the fact that they (or someone or some group working on their behalf) send these emails using very large scale "botnets" (definition) comprising several thousand of exploited public computers. Over the past three years, no fewer than six (6) IT security organizations have performed research on a variety of these botnets, most notably the Storm botnet, and discovered that one of the primary uses of this botnet was to send spam email messages promoting these CPh websites.

I myself have written on this blog and on numerous spam- and cybercrime-related forums regarding Canadian Pharmacy, and I've specifically been researching their operations starting in mid-2006. (previous posting) However I am far from the only individual researching this organization.

Finnish Security Company "F-Secure" posted research tying spam messages promoting spamvertised websites for CPh on November 11th, 2006. (source) In this research they discovered that a PC exploit then known as "Warezov" was capable of sending spam. That spam contained urls for websites promoting what was then known as "Pharmacy Express." Pharmacy Express turned into Canadian Pharmacy in early 2007. The spam runs promoting these websites would often send tens of millions of messages to addresses around the world. The domain names for the Pharmacy Express sites were virtually identical in naming structure to those used as name servers for other sites which were being used as infection points for the Warezov virus, as well as domains used as name servers for both the warezov infection sites and the CPh websites. More on Warezov and it's functionality later.

Fast-Flux Hosting Via Hijacked Public Computers (Storm Worm)

Focusing again on the abovementioned domain, we can see that some unique hosting solution is being used for the "dadsymbol.com" domain by running a "dig" command against that domain:



As you can see from this simple check, the website itself is hosted on rotating IP addresses. This is a technique known as "fast flux" hosting (definition), and it's used by these CPh sites to hide their true location. Research has shown that these IP addresses are, invariably, infected household PC's owned by individuals who are unaware that their computer has been taken over to be used in support of these illegally-operating websites.

The IP addresses in this particular example are all located in Beijing, China, hosted at three distinct companies:

China Network Communications Group Corporation
CHINANET hebei province network / China Telecom
Beijing Zhongbangyatong Telecom Technology Co.,Ltd

This is not often the case. Several researchers have discovered some CPh sites using household dsl connections in the US Midwest, cable internet connections in Poland, and numerous other types of always-on cable or dsl connections around the world. All of this is believe to be provided by the Storm worm.

100% False Claims

Canadian Pharmacy has made numerous completely false claims throughout nearly every word they say in every spam message sent, and on every page of their websites. Among these are claims that they offer security when processing credit cards (they do not, and never have, and this is something you can see by investigating any of the domains spammed to promote this operation,) that their products are safe (numerous researchers have found that they either contain no active ingredient, or that they contain only trace amounts of the active ingredient, or that they actually contain harmful elements or materials,) and they often listed contact information which was actually for the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia, who strenuously denied having anything to do with this operation or its continued illegal spamming practices. They also listed icons for the Better Business Bureau, Verified by Visa and an organization known as "Pharma Checker", none of whom actually supported or endorsed any of these sites. (And in all cases, representatives from all three expressed frustration in being able to get this group to remove their icons from their sites.) Only in the past four months have they removed these icons. It is unclear why, although one could surmise that the increased investigations into their operations are to blame.

In fact even the very name of these sites, Canadian Pharmacy, is a lie. They aren't located anywhere near Canada, the products often ship from India, and the domains and name servers are hosted around the world. There isn't any Canadian source for any of these websites.

Further: the contact information used to register websites and nameserver domains routinely feature 100% fake information. This is true for literally every single website registered for the promotion of Canadian Pharmacy.

These websites represent a very serious risk to the public's health, no matter which country the unwitting customers of these malicious websites happen to live in.

But I encourage you to join me in digging deeper into what other illicit activities this series of illegal websites is tied to.

Glavmed's Connection to Storm / Warezov Infections

I mentioned Warezov in an earlier paragraph.

Over the past 2 years, Warezov has come to be known alternately as Storm or Asprox. There are other names for this type of PC infection. It has continued to grow in size, and has continued to be used for all manner of illicit online activity ranging from the aforementioned spamming, through to plainly illegal activity such as performing large-scale Distributed Denial Of Service attacks (aka: DDOS attacks) against any site the botnet operator chooses (source), performing SQL injection attacks (source,) and most importantly for providing hosting and infrastructure for these Canadian Pharmacy websites, including name servers. Storm worm has also occasionally been used in phishing attempts. (source)

As far back as Jan. 31, 2008, tech news stories abounded that law enforcement authorities knew who had created and continued to operate the Storm worm (source), yet nearly a full year later absolutely no action has been taken against them. Further research by a variety of individuals as well as Wired Magazine tied Storm worm to a shadowy criminal organization known as the Russian Business Network, or "RBN". (source)

No less a source than the Washington Post's Brian Krebs has previously posted in great detail about who is behind the Storm Worm, and boldly declared he had connected all the dots in a story dating from January 29th, 2008. (source, with extensive background research.)

Glavmed Affiliate Program

In the past year, after monitoring numerous spam-friendly forums, many of which now no longer exist, I discovered one website which was responsible for acquiring new affiliates to promote the Canadian Pharmacy brand: a site called Glavmed.com. This is not immediately obvious from just visiting their main website, glavmed.com. (Although they do of course mention that the sites being promoted are pharmacy websites.) Their sites page features no mention of the brand "Canadian Pharmacy", only vague descriptions of what the sites sell, and that anyone can join this program. Their sign up form features no section where anyone needs to disclose whether they are a medical professional or a pharmacist at all, or whether they are retaining one for the purposes of fulfilling prescriptions for the pharmaceuticals these sites sell.

So how did I discover the link between Glavmed's affiliate program and Canadian Pharmacy? I joined their affiliate program. I will not disclose the details of my affiliate account other than to say that I have never used it for any promotional purposes on behalf of glavmed or Canadian pharmacy. Once I was approved, I was sent a link to their site templates which made it very clear that this was a very large-scale, highly organized operation, and that they are indeed 100% responsible for Canadian Pharmacy, and therefore responsible for the relentless spamming which occurs on their behalf.

As it turns out, apparently one of their supporters or affiliates posted a very Glavmed-friendly piece on a website known as atlantea.com (source), which alleges to rate the various online pharmacies promoted by Glavmed. They of course make absolutely no mention of the fact that these sites are easily the most prolifically-spammed properties on the Internet today. That entire domain appears to be a very spam-friendly site, and it links to a known base-domain which glavmed sites have been using for payment processing for three years now, rx-partners.biz.

Some interesting additional notes: They have modified several threads in their forums. These threads previously contained postings by several members which made it very clear that not only were Glavmed and their affiliates aware that many of their ranks were involved in large-scale spamming, but that they also knew they were lying about the use of logos such as that of Pharma Checker.

This thread previously had a posting (following posting #4, which is now the final posting in that thread) which stated that there was no valid Pharma Checker account for the Canadian Pharmacy websites. (A valid Pharma Checker is required in order to place a link to any pharmaceutical sites within a Google Adsense campaign, among many others. One affiliate was refused. I feel certain that many others must have been refused as well.) Another thread regarding spamming (source) had several pro-spam postings dating back to late 2007. These were removed sometime between December 2008 and January 2009. That was previously located after posting #3. Clearly someone is removing any expository evidence. (I and many others have archives of this forum however.)

Glavmed / Spamit / Storm / Canadian Pharmacy / RBN

Further, no less an authority than Ironport, a major spam-fighting corporation, made direct connections between Storm worm, Canadian Pharmacy, Glavmed, and their underground affiliate portal (and likely the real smoking gun) known as Spamit.com. (source) Ironport also placed several orders to verify what would happen with their bait credit card information, and to see whether they would actually receive anything from the order. They did receive a package containing pills which contained sugar and what was referred to as "inert filler". Another contained "high metal content". This is clearly a very high risk to the public's health.

I and many other researchers and security professionals believe it is time for someone to take decisive action against this operation, which has profited for at least four years now and is only continuing to grow. Research and evidence abounds regarding the connections between Canadian Pharmacy, Glavmed, The Storm Worm and the Russian Business Network. All of these are known by numerous security and law enforcement agencies to be operating in flagrant violation of international law. I and the citizens of my country and those of pretty much every other country are fed up with continual bombardment of these spam messages, promoting websites which lie in every word of their content, which sell fake and harmful products, and which endanger the lives of the general public. We are fed up with the complete lack of action on behalf of anyone in Law Enforcement to go after Glavmed, their affiliates, their site operators, their payment processors, their hosting providers and their domain registrars. The time for action is now, especially with the abundance of available research into this organization and their practices.

Please take this appeal very seriously. I welcome your feedback.

Very sincerely,

SiL / IKS / concerned citizen

Further research into Canadian Pharmacy

Spam Wiki: Canadian Pharmacy
http://spamtrackers.eu/wiki/index.php?title=Canadian_Pharmacy

Further research into the Storm Worm

Storm Worm Botnet Cracked Wide Open
http://www.heise-online.co.uk/security/Storm-Worm-botnet-cracked-wide-open--/news/112385

Russian Business Network (RBN): Georgia Cyberwarfare - Attribution & Spam Botnets
http://rbnexploit.blogspot.com/2008/08/rbn-georgia-cyberwarfare-attribution.html

Full-disclosure: It's time to get serious about Storm Worm / RBN
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2008/Mar/0300.html

Slashdot: We Know Who's Behind Storm Worm
http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/01/29/1823242

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

I agree almost entirely with your post. Almost. You say that Canadian Pharmacy never has provided any security in credit card orders. I believe their order processing page, Secure.Order.Form, used to be on an https/secure system. Even now, almost never, but some rare times an order form will be secure. Every now and then they lose (one of) their support site(s). It used to be common to find a link to a support site or an email contact in the response after submitting an order. I know of one or two CanPharm sites which still provide such a link. Never had I seen any security (I had to submit a fake order to get the support site's location) at canadian-meds-shop.com until 20 January when making a selection and going to the order form sent me to https://rxbill-secure.com/process_order.php
(in almost all cases the data is submitted to the pharmacy site one reaches without being sent on to a secure order processing site). Let me check ... I still get the secure site for submitting my order data and ... I get a link to a support site, http://my-order-status.info/

While it is extremely rare (at least now) to find any security, it is not totally unheard of.

Anonymous said...

Well put SiL. The 500 pound elephant in the room (ie: Glavmed) has been ignored for far too long.

IKillSpammerz said...

My point is: in 100% of the sites I investigated (and that number is in the high four-digits and counting), not a single one featured any such security.

But your point is well taken. It's certainly possible that they might, from time to time, actually have the use of an SSL server. I've just never seen it, nor have any of my other colleagues.

SiL

AlphaCentauri said...

Great post, SiL. These guys are dangerous.

I just saw a comment on a ripoff-report type of site from some elderly woman who was ordering her diuretic from them because her doctor wouldn't prescribe any more if she didn't get blood tests done. And with good reason! She could have a potassium level so low her heart could stop, or she could be in kidney failure, or her swelling could be due to some other reason like heart failure or low thyroid. Some drugs are prescription-only because even doctors shouldn't use them without getting proper monitoring.

As far as secure ordering, it's not just the credit card number that needs to be transmitted using a secure site. Canadian Pharmacy sites are collecting people's personal health information and making it visible to all kinds of people as their order travels around the internet.

IKillSpammerz said...

> Great post, SiL. These guys are dangerous.

It's apparently being seen by the right people.

The sheer volume of systems and processes that this single group is abusing - both in terms of the public's health and safety, and the overall infrastructure of the Internet itself - is staggering. They will abuse, hack, hijack and overtake any public web system they can. They will abuse every free-mail system and free-web-hosting setup they can get their grubby hands on, and of course they will hijack your computer, and that of anyone else they can infect, all to support this completely illegal and harmful fake pharmacy, in the hopes of selling dangerous fake drugs to unwitting victims like the individual you described.

Someone has to shut these criminals down.

SiL

Anonymous said...

This company is using 2 of my domains to spam their website
so what can I do to stop this in my opinion a fraudulent use of my property

sales@internationaltravellerscardonline.com
sales@itccommunications.net

We have no e-mail addresses with this prefix

Anonymous said...

theft of domain addresses by Canadian Pharmacy
http://itccommunicationsnet-johnnichols.blogspot.com/2009/02/this-company-have-stolen-two-of-my.html

IKillSpammerz said...

> This company is using 2 of my domains to spam their website
> so what can I do to stop this in my opinion a fraudulent use
> of my property


If you read comments throughout this site, you'll find you're in good company. They use every domain on the entire Internet as the "from" or "reply-to" address. They don't care.

> We have no e-mail addresses with this prefix

In this particular case you're referring to what are known as "catch-all" addresses. Any default address that doesn't exist will bounce to a "catch-all" account. So if I send email to sdjhdtfsydtfsyuf [at] itccommunications.net, you'll probably get that as well. You can configure your mail server to disallow catch-alls and instead delete the inbound message. That won't stop them from continuing to spam those addresses. They're idiots. (Rather: their persistent mailers are idiots.)

There is no way to get off their lists, so instead I'd recommend that you direct your legal department to this blog posting so that they can examine legal action directly against Glavmed and their affiliates, who clearly have no intention of stopping this relentless, malicious abuse of the entire public Internet.

Somebody with deep enough pockets should seriously consider taking strong legal action against Glavmed. They'd be perceived as heroes by the millions of recipients of this unending, illegal spam.

SiL

Anonymous said...

I'm baffled by all of this! Why is law enforcement ignoring this? Don't they have the tools to find out who is doing this, and shut them down? Isn't it a simple matter of placing a few orders, and tracing where the money goes through credit card companies? And why aren't the pharmaceutical companies getting together to fight this? Not only is this taking business away from them, it's tarnishing their reputation, because the sugar pills that don't work bear the names of their legitimate products. Where's the FDA in all of this?

Less easy than that, why do companies who have had their servers compromised not trace where the orders are going? And why doesn't someone upgrade the whole email system so that you can't fake a sender's email address?

OK, I know the last 2 questions are more far-fetched, but, really! I can't understand how this has been allowed to go on for so long! Is it because the Russian government won't cooperate with our officials?

I came into this whole thing with the attitude that I am one of the few people who will take the time to report the spams to Spamcop and other services, so someone will do something about it. But, after reading all the things in these posts, it looks like any time I spend on this will be totally wasted.

Someone, please make a post to answer some of my questions. What can we do to stop this menace? Maybe there is something I am missing...

IKillSpammerz said...

Another anonymous commenter. :)

I'd just like to suggest that there's nothing wrong with using a pseudonym when you comment. Due to the sheer volume of anonymous comments on behalf of angry spammers or supporters of spam operations, I'm in the habit of completely ignoring Anonymous commenters. Please keep that in mind if you actually want a response.

> I'm baffled by all of this! Why is law enforcement ignoring
> this?


It's not that they're ignoring it. It's that it involves "law enforcement" in numerous territories and jurisdictions.

That makes it very slow to bring charges and be able to execute on those charges. This has been discussed in several comments throughout this blog for many months.

> Don't they have the tools to find out who is doing
> this, and shut them down?


Effectively, no. And who, specifically, do you mean when you say "they"? I'm not trying to be obtuse. You are very much oversimplifying the situation that any law enforcement agency faces when attempting to investigate these criminal operations. If I live in New York, and receive spam which can provably be said to have originated from Russia: what is the NYPD supposed to do, exactly?

> Isn't it a simple matter of
> placing a few orders, and tracing where the money goes
> through credit card companies?


From the standpoint of a company like Visa: yes it is, and on that point I am in agreement. Visa should be strictly monitoring these transactions, and revoking merchant accounts for the companies they discover are supporting these arguably illegal operations. Why they don't do this is beyond my comprehension.

> And why aren't the
> pharmaceutical companies getting together to fight this?


Eli Lilly, Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline each have their own confidential investigations which have been ongoing, and (believe it or not) have led to charges, arrests and convictions over the years. These have primarily been more on the manufacturing end of things, ferreting out underground and black-market pill manufacturing operations and the shipping and supply-chain operations which support them. This makes sense since this is where each of those companies would need to see significant action taken. As with the abovementioned description of the law enforcement conundrum, you can imagine how long it can take to get police offices in foreign companies to respond and take action on these types of charges. It won't happen overnight. The criminals running these operations know that. In fact they're counting on it.

> Not only is this taking business away from them, it's tarnishing
> their reputation, because the sugar pills that don't work
> bear the names of their legitimate products. Where's the FDA
> in all of this?


The FDA is actually very much aware of it, but since it's a (United States, only) government agency, there are the inherent slowdowns and other issues that can cause many investigations to stagnate.

> Less easy than that, why do companies who have had their
> servers compromised not trace where the orders are going?


I've been trying to contact several dozen such companies just to notify them that their servers were compromised. Out of (so far) approx. 400 such reports, I have only received contact from seven (7). Those are not good odds. So not only aren't they actively monitoring anything, they aren't even responding to security alerts from anyone trying to notify them that their servers are hijacked. Again: the criminals know this. They're counting on it.

> And why doesn't someone upgrade the whole email system so
> that you can't fake a sender's email address?


That is apparently already underway, but -- as you might expect -- that is also far from an overnight task. Hundreds of millions of people around the world use email already. How do you propose this new email system be reliably rolled out?

> OK, I know the last 2 questions are more far-fetched, but,
> really! I can't understand how this has been allowed to go
> on for so long! Is it because the Russian government won't
> cooperate with our officials?


Now you're getting warmer. :)

Nutshell, point form description:

- Glavmed [Affiliate program, based in Russia / Ukraine]
- Spamit [Underground, "spam-only" affiliate program, also based in Russia, which is a sister program to Glavmed]
- Canadian Pharmacy [Hosted all over the world, creating profits for Glavmed, who hire spammers to promote it]
- Server hijacks alleged to be conducted by Russian Business Network [aka: RBN, based in - you guessed it - Russia]
- Consumer-facing worm / virus / trojan infections such as storm, zhelatin, and most recently conficker. All alleged to be on behalf of RBN.
- RBN operators apparently have ties to someone in Russian government. Many journalists and bloggers wrote about this last year. They apparently also have protection from the Russian FSB, aka: the former KGB. [source, among numerous such sources.]

So in short: yes. Russian government representatives keeps remaining silent about this issue, which nobody is seriously pressing them on really in the first place. And some digging has shown that the RBN actually have support of either the Russian government, or the FSB, or both.

> I came into this whole thing with the attitude that I am one
> of the few people who will take the time to report the spams
> to Spamcop and other services, so someone will do something
> about it. But, after reading all the things in these posts,
> it looks like any time I spend on this will be totally
> wasted.


Not so.

Keep in mind, when charges do finally get laid against these criminals, reports such as yours, which the FTC, FDA, law enforcement, spamcop and spamhaus have been collecting lo these many years and counting, will be used against them in court. Add that to the dozens of research blogs which have been connecting the dots on these scumbags for years now and you have a pretty watertight court case. So while it may seem like a waste of time now, just keep in mind that actions like the ones you are taking already have proven to be very effective against organizations such as SanCash, which had to completely disband last year after similar charges were laid against them.

Just because the change is not immediate does not mean that change is not occurring.

> Someone, please make a post to answer some of my questions.
> What can we do to stop this menace? Maybe there is something
> I am missing...


As long as the discussion keeps going, and more people like you get fed up enough to tell someone else about it, and the light keeps shinging brighter and brighter on criminal operations like these, it will inevitably become impossible to remain underground, and therefore very difficult for them to remain profitable while still remaining hidden from the public eye.

I started this blog for that very reason. That Glavmed have noticed my blog, and you have commented on this posting, is proof that the word is spreading effectively. We just have to keep it up.

Thank you for your comments, and your insightful questions.

SiL / IKS / concerned citizen

12PalmsHomeAndGifts said...

I ordered from Canadian Pharmacy and realized the generic was fake after receiving it. I should have known better and feel like such an idiot. I am usually much smarter about these places. I really feel sick now that they have my credit card number. Guess I should cancell it. Wish I would have checked them out and seen your blog sooner. Thanks for posting about them.

Anonymous said...

Seriously, for all that research no one actually has a good solution on how to actually BLOCK or STOP getting these blasted emails. I'm getting 15-20 a day and it's driving me nuts.

IKillSpammerz said...

> Seriously, for all that research no one actually has a good
> solution on how to actually BLOCK or STOP getting these
> blasted emails. I'm getting 15-20 a day and it's driving me
> nuts.


Well: sadly, no they don't. You can always switch to Gmail. Their filtering is seriously the best I've ever come across, and the spammers behind this group have an extremely difficult time getting any messages past it.

btw: how do you think law enforcement feels about all this? It's not like everyone in the world loves receiving these messages, but they still do receive them.

SiL

Amanda said...

Clearly, attribution will be difficult to prove. but there are significant possible implications, beyond further proof that cyber warfare is becoming a part of mainstream international conflict.

jjjooommm222 said...

I am currently fighting these jackasses. The biggest problem is the hosts of the sites (well ignoring the idiots who have zombie computers and screw the rest of us). When complaining, many of them do not respond, and continue hosting these sites. Elips Elektronik in Turkey and Turk Telekom are two of the biggest offenders, they host thousands of these sites and I've never gotten a response yet from complaining.


But I must object to your stance on the issue of selling without prescription. There is nothing wrong with selling a drug without a prescription. I have a right to ingest and treat anything in anyway I want so long as I don't infringe upon another's rights. Me taking some drug without a random government licensee's permission does no harm to anyone's rights, and is not wrong.

If you want to complain of the illegality, fine. But don't embrace the prohibition currently waged against people's rights to treat their medical problems in ways they wish- as all adults should be able to.

IKillSpammerz said...

@jjjooommm222, you are correct. Turkey is a current hotbed of illicit hosting of all manner of illegal sites and malware. They do literally nothing about it.

> But I must object to your stance on the issue of selling
> without prescription. There is nothing wrong with selling a
> drug without a prescription.


Tell that to people who are currently purchasing combinations of drugs which (assuming they contain any active ingredients whatsoever) can kill them. Canadian Pharmacy sites are renowned for always including a "free" order of Viagra. Viagra should never be sold in combination with a wide variety of drugs, which is why having a legitimate pharmacist on staff is a good idea. Any brick-and-mortar pharmacy would be sued out of existence for pairing Viagra with the drugs that Canadian Pharmacy allow to be paired with. There is plenty wrong with operating an online pharmacy without having a registered pharmacist - or really any medical personnel to speak of - on staff.

> I have a right to ingest and
> treat anything in anyway I want so long as I don't infringe
> upon another's rights.


Sure: If you have a death wish.

> Me taking some drug without a random
> government licensee's permission does no harm to anyone's
> rights, and is not wrong.


See above. There have been several stories dating back to around 2006 regarding actual deaths from the fake and dangerous products these sites sell, and regarding addicts who receive ridiculously high doses of painkillers like Hydrocodone. If you don't think that's wrong, I think maybe you should do some research. This is not a "big brother" issue. These sites are killing people, and any site which does not follow some pretty well-laid-out procedures regarding the sale, dosage and control of addictive pharmaceuticals represents a very real risk to the public.

> If you want to complain of the illegality, fine. But don't
> embrace the prohibition currently waged against people's
> rights to treat their medical problems in ways they wish- as
> all adults should be able to.


How did this turn into an argument about "rights"?!

You can't go around selling buckets of highly addictive pain killers, or really a wide variety of other drugs, without it having a very seriously detrimental effect on the public's health. That is not a violation of anyone's "rights", it's a public safety hazard. This is precisely why these sites are illegal.

SiL

Anonymous said...

It is a rights issue.

Suppose the drugs are real. Wouldn't you want to have a choice? Without having to visit doctor, and then spending $15 anytime you need a viagra pop?

Its a freedom of choice issue.

About your other comments I agree. If they sell fake medications (which I actually doubt they do), they should be stopped.

IKillSpammerz said...

> If they sell fake medications (which I actually doubt they
> do), they should be stopped.


There are no fewer than seven north american media reports spanning five years regarding the bogus quality of these pills and the unacceptable methods by which they are manufactured and shipped.

When they do contain the active ingredient (and not many of them do), it is in such small amounts as to be essentially a sugar pill.

They're made by unmonitored factories in India which are violating the patents of Pfizer and numerous other pharmaceutical companies. As such they are cutting corners to produce cheaper pills so they can sell them at high volume. If you think that's in any way a trustworthy method of providing medications to the public I think you have a very skewed sense of what's acceptable to put into your body.

SiL

Anonymous said...

You're all assholes, you are deceived: (
Nowhere is there are no expensive pills pills like you have in the U.S.
You pay up to 100 times more expensive per pill than it really costs.
Your pharmaceutical companies to make a fool of you.
Tablets are not fake, and are generic drugs, so are cheaper.
And so we are criminals ?????
Think about it ...
P.S. Rules prohibited spam. Advertisers who spam do not receive payments. They are punished for it. In the Russian Criminal Code is a penalty for spamming. Spam addressed by other affiliate programs, of which the Internet more than a hundred ..

IKillSpammerz said...

> You're all assholes, you are deceived: (

I think it's completely the other way around, and I am definitely not alone.

> Nowhere is there are no expensive pills pills like you have
> in the U.S.


I'm not sure what you're trying to say. We know that pills are expensive in the US.

> You pay up to 100 times more expensive per pill than it
> really costs.


That's your opinion. We have no control over how pharmaceutical companies set their prices, and they're different in every country.

> Your pharmaceutical companies to make a fool of you.

Actually they have zero effect on me. I don't use pharmaceuticals of any sort.

> Tablets are not fake, and are generic drugs, so are cheaper.
> And so we are criminals ?????


a) There is no such thing as "Generic" viagra. Not in the US, not in Canada, not in the UK.
b) It has been proven numerous times, by numerous researchers, that the alleged active ingredient in pills which are sold via scumbag spamming operations like Bulker.biz / Eva Pharmacy (in fact especially those programs) are either not present at all in the pills or are present in such low doses as to be worthless.

So yes: you are criminals.

Also: you ship these fake pills from India into the US. That's a violation of numerous import laws and numerous FDA laws in the US. So you're now US federal criminals, not just international small-timers.

> Think about it ...

Uh: Probably that should be you thinking about it, "Anonymous" idiot spammer.

> P.S. Rules prohibited spam. Advertisers who spam do not
> receive payments. They are punished for it.


Tell me another one. The only way I or anyone else have heard of these sites is because you relentlessly spam. I call bullshit. You're also a terrible liar.

> In the Russian
> Criminal Code is a penalty for spamming. Spam addressed by
> other affiliate programs, of which the Internet more than a
> hundred ..


No there is not any such law. Again: learn to lie better.

SiL